Regression testing isn’t only about repetition



Often when I’m chatting with someone about their regression testing strategy there is an assumption regression is all about repeating the same tests. This is a bit problematic because it ignores an important aspect which testers tend to be good at: focusing on risk. A better way to think of regression testing is it can be applied in two different ways: Procedurally and Risk-Focused

Procedural Regression Tests

When I speak of procedural I mean a sequence of actions or steps followed in regular order.  As I said above this seems to be the primary way people think about regression testing: repetition of the same tests. This extends to the way we think about automating tests as well.

Procedural regression testing can be quite valuable (so far as any single technique can be). The most valuable procedural regression tests are unit tests when applied to our CI system and run regularly. In this way they become a predictable detector of change, which is often why we run regression tests in the first place. (Funny enough automated UI tests are some of the most common procedural regression tests but aren’t the best detectors of change). 

The big problem with procedural regression tests are that once an application has passed a test, there is a very low probability of it finding another bug. 

Risk-Focused Regression Tests

When I speak of risk-focused I mean testing for the same risks (ways the application might fail) but changing up the individual tests we run. We might create new tests, combine previous tests, alter underlying data or infrastructure to yield new and interesting results.

To increase the probability of finding new bugs we start testing for side effects of the change(s) rather than going for repetition. The most valuable risk focused regression tests are typically done by the individual testers (or developers) who know how to alter their behavior with each pass through the system.  

A Combined Approach

Thinking about regression testing in terms of procedural and risk focus allows us to see two complementary approaches that can yield value at different times in our projects. It also gives testers an escape from the burden that comes  with repetition while still allowing us to meet our goals.

On other platforms:

If you liked this article please consider sharing it or buying me a coffee: