Learning about customers

Working for a startup company you go through a lot of problems, potential solutions and more problems. I was reminded of my company in the article by Startup Lessons Learned entitled Validated learning about customers. Eric Ries, who writes the Startup Lessons Learned blog, describes two scenarios with two fictional companies.

My company is like the first company in his post: the metrics of success change constantly and our product definition fluctuates regularly. Our development team is always busy but those efforts don’t exactly lead to added value to the product. We are pretty good at selling the one-time product but we have to put a lot of effort into each sale and so the sales process isn’t scalable. Worse it’s frustrating that management doesn’t see this.

At the end of the article Eric lists some solutions to companies with this “stuck in the mud” situation and I think the third solution is something my company should try: build tools to help the sales team reduce the time on each sale and try building parts of our product that make the sales process faster or the investment afterwards less. (I added that last bit). How good is your product if it requires customers spend large amounts of time, energy and money in order to make it usable? Shouldn’t the company make the use of your product as frictionless and automated as possible so it’s easy for customers?

After reading this article I’m interested in reading his full book: The Lean Startup.

5 Ways to Revolutionize your QA

I can’t remember where I originally found this post and the corresponding eBook but the eBook is definitely worth taking a look at. Here is the former uTest blog post, now Applause blog post.

The 5 ways or insights are:

  1. There are two types of code and they require different types of testing
  2. Take your testing down a level from features to capabilities
  3. Take your testing up a level from test cases to techniques
  4. Improving development is your top priority
  5. Testing without innovation is a great way to lose talent

In point 2, James Whittaker also talks about a planning and analysis tool he used at Microsoft called a CFC or Component – Feature – Capability analysis. This allowed them to take testing down from features to capabilities.

The purpose is to understand the testable capabilities of a feature and to identify important interfaces where features interact with each other and external components. Once these are understood, then testing becomes the task of selecting environment and input variations that cover the primary cases.

While this tool was designed for testing desktop software I’m inclined to think it would work well for testing web applications. Essentially with the CFC you are mapping out the individual components / features in the web application in a branching form that closely resembles a mind map. Matter of fact a mind map might be better! =)